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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 74 (some duplicates have been removed)
, they passed it the first time in maine, maryland and washington state and in minnesota, they have -- they've refused to define marriage as between a man and a woman, which means the legislature could now legalize gay marriage if it wanted to. this means this issue -- the first time after 32 decisions in the other direction at the state level where gay marriage was approved, it means it's settled on the road to being settled democratically. >> well, it also means it's solved at the federal level. i mean, the other big such-- >> at the state level. >> at the state level, federal -- yes, the other referendum, to legalize marijuana generally, that passed in colorado and washington. if you add the fact that gay marriage passed in maryland and-- what you see is a cultural divide occurring in the country. these things will never pass in the south, in north carolina, i believe, had a referendum saying that marriage was between a man and a woman. nor will they pass in the mountain states, so you see the dividing that way culturally. >> paul: we'll see where marijuana goes. we have to take one more
. this is "your money." the elections are over. the american people have spoken. now it's time for washington to get to work. >> you elected us to focus on your jobs, not ours. >> that's because nothing is more important to our economic recovery than creating jobs. president obama says he'll add 12 million jobs over the next four years. but for his math to work, the pace of economic growth needs to pick up. with a crisis in europe and a slowdown in asia, an economic storm beyond our control stands ready to batter our shores. still, two years of consistent job growth prove we are heading in the right direction, but the fiscal cliff is one storm that will be of our own making unless washington acts. $7 trillion in across-the-board tax hikes and spending cuts over the next decade mandated to begin in january. it's the legislative equivalent of a slow motion train wreck that washington can avoid. the question? will congress and the president drive that train over a cliff? >> we won't solve the problem of our fiscal imbalance overnight. >> the elections are over. the threats to our economy are not
>> "inside washington" is brought to you in part by the federal association of employees, proud to make the gornment work. >> production assistants for "inside washington" provided by albritton communications and "politico." >> we have to pick ourselves up. we have fought our way back. and we know in our hearts that for the united states of america, the best is yet to come. >> this week, the post-election rubio. >> i still wish i had been able to fulfill your hopes to lead the country in a different direction. >> and where do we go from here? >> mr. president, we stand ready to work with you. >> the republicans take a look at their game plan. >> i think republicans have done a lousy job of reaching out to people of color. >> an amazing campaign. let me be clear. i did not bill that. you build that. >> also a look at ballot initiatives, including legalizing pot. >> this is the best day of my life. captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- >> it was a long, anxious night for a lot of people in this town and across the nion,ut then the networks called ohio a
near 50 here in washington. near 50 also in montgomery county. martinsburg, west virginia, already at 47 degrees and your planner for today, temperature in the low 50s here. we'll be real close, maybe even above the 70-degree mark before the day is done, and staying mild overnight tonight as well. we'll talk about tomorrow and all the big changes and the rain drops arrive. coming up. >>> this morning, people around the country are celebrating veterans day. people are honoring the countless men and women who fought for our country. >> here in the nation's capital, it's a somber day of remembrance and a day of giving back. derrick ward is on the national mall where several events are scheduled today. >> reporter: we are here at the world war ii memorial, where an event will be getting under way any minute now. may have actually started. there's going to be a wreath laying here and notes from the keynote speaker that tloed this -- led to this memorial. this is a group from illinois. they'll be participating as well. for these people that take part in this freedom flight, the quick tim
from washington the mclaughlin group, the american original. for over three decades sources, hardest talk. >>> issue one. still chief. >>> thank you, thank you so much. tonight, more than 200 years after a former colony won the right to determine its own destiny, the task of perfecting our union moves forward. tonight, in this election you, the american people, reminded us that while our road has been hard, while our journey has been long, we have picked ourselves up. we have fought our way back, and we know, in our hearts, that for the united states of america, the best is yet to come. whether you held an obama sign or a romney sign, you made your voice heard and you made a difference. >>> the tally. president obama 50%. 58 millian votes. mitt romney, 48%. 56 million votes. so much for the popular vote. the electoral vote. 270 needed to win. president obama 303, governor romney 206. still unassigned, 29, florida is conducting a recount. >>> was this election a mandate, a landslide, a rout, a speaker, a marginal win, what was it? >> it is a significant victory by the preside
>>> and now, from washington's leadg news station, this is "news4 today." >> hey, everyone, goomorning. welcome to "news4 today." i'm richard jordan. >> sunday, november 11th, 2012. also veterans day across our country. >> we're going to have some warm weather for the holiday, at least warm november standards. chuck bell is joining us with more on that. good morning, chuck. >> good morning, richard and angie, and a good sunday morning, everybody. warm indeed, especially by november standards. warm enough to actually feel like early october. a real pleasant day to be outside today. we're off to a seasonably chilly start this morning. mildest right alongside the western shore of the chesapeake bay. 49 in annapolis. 48 at solomon's island. but don't have to go too far to the west to the water to start cooling down. temperatures mid 30s across parts of shenandoah valley and the blue ridge. no rain. closest drops are a long way away. at least 36 hours before a chance at a rain drop. that means your sunday is going to be a winner. temperatures should be in the low 50s by 10:00 th
riley and washington columnist kim strassel. start with you, when you get a defeat like this, there's no one thing necessarily that explains it. but why don't you pick out your most important? >> look, i think there were two things key to the obama victory, one was that very ol on, they ran this very high dollar attack campaign against mitt romney, a bit of a character assassination throughout the summer and mitt romney didn't respond to it and he didn't recover from it. when you combine that with the president's brutally efficient, we now know turnout operation in core states like ohio, virginia and florida, popular vote pretty close in the end. in the end he got out the partisans in much the same numbers in 2008 and that's what won it for him. >> paul: so, kim, you're saying that's about 100 million dollars or more that the obama campaign poured on mitt romney on bain capital on his tax returns on the fact that he's a pluto kratt, and making him to be gordon gecko without the social-- and romney, would you agree they made a fatal mistake in not countering the attack ads? >> i thin
party in washington, the party of money. and frankly, if you or i were elected to congress, we'd have to behave like every member of congress does if we want to get reelected, which means we have to his top the people who provide the money for the campaigns for us to run to office, and it's not just joe six pack and mary smith. it's representatives of big corporations and wealthy individuals who come pleading, i just need a little change here to be fair. but they really want to unlevel the playing field and thwart the rigors of the market. there's no such thing as deregulation. that's only new regulation, so what we have done is taken regulations -- i'm not going to defend every regulation, but we took a regulatory scheme that looked at the interests of companies and the interests of customers and other parties, and replaced it with a system of the corporations, by the corporations, that takes away consumer rights. everything is regulated. i like to say, baseball regulates right down to how many stitches on the ball and the color of yarn. everything is regulated. most of the regulatio
in the senate and the way it operated. it was a magnet for a lot of us coming to washington. wandering the halls, and i did not know them all in the 1970's were madeleine albright, stephen breyer, susan collins, lamar alexander. many of the leaders. and in the media today, chris matthews, george will. many of these people got their training in the senate. we were not part of the greatest generation. we have the next best thing. we were trained by them. host: our next call for ira shapiro comes from barry. you have to turn down your set. we are getting feedback. caller: i just turned it down. this is why they had more democrats back then, because of the tea party. they made our government stagnant. they are upset about capitalism. that is what built our country. we send them a strong message. as americans, we need to back up the present by getting more involved with the senate. e-mail in your search senator, your congressman and even the president. -- e-mail your senator, the congressman, and even the president. host: we will leave it there. talk to us a little bit about what barry brought up. it
and that country's reaction to the reelection of president obama. "washington journal" next. host: good morning. live coverage of the president's remarks at arlington national cemetery. it was on this date in 1918 that hostilities ended in world war i. on this november 11, the country remembers those who lost their lives and paid the ultimate price varied at arlington national cemetery and other cemeteries around the country. for congress, it is a back to work week for the start of the lame-duck session including the ongoing debate over the fiscal cliff. grover norquist on the tax pledge will be one of the topics. we want to focus on whether you think the tax pledge is still relevant. give us a call. you can also join the conversation on our twitter page or send us an e-mail. let's begin with a look at some of the headlines. we are beginning with the front page of "the new york times." andpolitico has this story -- grover norquist is optimistic about the party being as strong as ever. he carries around copies of a map showing republican dominance all over the country. he insists the party is we
of cia director david petraeus's resignation raising questions here in washington. what the intelligence committee is saying about her plans to investigate the affair that brought petraeus down approximate what it means for the libya hearing. more than 100,000 people without power in the wake of hurricane sandy. protests breaking out in new york, as the utility companies offer little guidance. we are live on the ground. honoring our armed service members, we will introduce you to the best charities helping our military and their family this is veterans day. i'm shannon bream, live from our nation's capitol. >> we are learning new details about the scandal that ended the public career of cia director david petraeus and how it could affect upcoming hearings about the benghazi investigation. the chair of the national intelligence committee says she did not received any -- receive any advance notice of this investigation. >> the senate intelligence committee received no advanced notice of any kind of investigation into director petraeus and chairwoman dianne feinstein said that finding out a
veterans remembrance ceremony. >> as washington likes are against this grover norquist. they are noted for the anti-tax plans. our panel of journalists, steven sloan from politico and russell berman from "the hill" >> thank you for being here. i want to talk about your interpretation of the election and what it means for the direction of tax policy. >> we had a split decision appeared the president won by two points. he won by 7.2 years ago against a war hero. he and 9 million fewer votes. he is a lame duck now. he said he was interested in raising taxes a year from now on anyone. his physician from four years ago was that they would not raise taxes on anyone. he was very clear and no taxes if you made less than $250,000. this year august 8, he started with a new framework. my plan is that i will not raise taxes on anyone who earns less than $250,000 a year. his only promising -- he is only promising not to raise income taxes. this is not include energy taxes. is only promising to protect income taxes for one year. at the end of the year, he has promised the middle-clas
. he talked to kristen welker. she's in washington with more. >> i interviewed steven boylan by phone saturday. he called petraeus a mentor and friend. boylan says he's stunned by the news about his former boss. in the meantime, new details are emerging about how this all came to light. according to multiple sources, the down fall of general david petraeus all started with a seemingly unrelated complaint to the fbi. officials say it was triggered by e-mails from paula broadwell to another woman not related to petraeus who felt she was being harassed and complained to the fbi. officials say in recent weeks, the fb icht traced the e-mails to broadwell and only stumbled on the relationship with petraeus as a result. >> my first reaction was disbelief. >> reporter: steven boylan worked with petraeus from 2005 to 2008, including in iraq. the two have remained close and spoke by phone on saturday. >> he said he had an excellent job, an exceptional family, he had had a great relationship he thought with the white house. and in his words, he screwed up. and he knows it. >> reporter: officials
and direction of. and with colorado and washington is a huge geo on a drug prohibition that is how it will end in this country like alcohol prohibition. john: alcohol prohibition was repealed by individual states before the federal government? >> one dozen states by the end of the period. john: new york was three years. 104 -- 10 years and forstmann was up to the fed. >> states lived in open defiance than the federal government cannot enforce it the fast majority is that the state level there are not enough agents to go to every colorado pot smoker. >> gapped the same time goodie a was warning people listen, a federal laws are still enforced. but the shift to marriage equality maine, maryland. john: stay on marijuana. >> i am happy to stay on marijuana. [laughter] john: that does not mean they're not in trouble and the obama administration had more dispensaries. >> actually the clinton administrations started to raid merit -- medical marijuana dispensaries that became the goal. john: even after saying we would not. >> exactly. it is of major issue not about drug legalization but can the states
the private and public sector, all of whom have traveled here from washington, dc from sacramento and all over the bay area. so thank you for being here today. we are grateful for an opportunity to come together with you to create schools and communities where young people are healthy and safe and feel welcome and they are allowed to learn and they are allowed to thrive. this day is devoted to help all of us deepen our understanding of this issue of the problem through data, through research, through anecdotes, to put real solutions in place, to comply with new state and draw laws on bullying and to measure our progress. it's a promise we want to join you in keeping to our children and our youth in california. some of you know that we started this summit yesterday with a screening of the documentary film, bully, to 3,000 students in san francisco from san francisco's public schools. the superintendent of schools you're going to hear from in a minute, he was there, i know ter theresa sparks was there, i was so proud of san francisco in being there because the superintendent, he's, you can
yesterday to vote in a libertarian and direction of. and with colorado and washington is a huge geo on a drug prohibition that is how it will end in this country like alcohol prohibition. john: alcohol prohibition was repealed by individual states before the federal government? >> one dozen states by the end of the period. john: new york was three years. 104 -- 10 years and forstmann was up to the fed. >> states lived in open defiance than the federal government cannot enforce it the fast majority is that the state level there are not enough agents to go to every colorado pot smoker. >> gapped the same time goodie a was warning people listen, a federal laws are still enforced. but the shift to marriage equality maine, maryland. john: stay on marijuana. >> i am happy to stay on marijuana. [laughter] john: that does not mean they're not in trouble and the obama administration had more dispensaries. >> actually the clinton administrations started to raid merit -- medical marijuana dispensaries that became the goal. john: even after saying we would not. >> exactly. it is of major issue
' extramarital affair compromise intelligence? >>> with washington still divided after tuesday's election, can the president and congress find common ground on the fiscal cliff, immigration and other big issues? we'll ask our headliners, the vice chair of the senate intelligence committee, republican saxby chambliss and the senator responsible to adding to the democrat majority, senator patty murray. >>> and our powerhouse round table, with representatives donna edwards and aaron schock, paul gigot, katrina vanden heuvel and greta van susteren. >>> hello, again. what a week in politics. with his victory in florida yesterday, president obama now has a sweep of the battlegrounds. 332 electoral votes. losing only indiana and north carolina from his 2008 total. the popular votes are still coming in. the president will come up about 8 million short of his 2008 tally. but, he's holding about 3 million advantage over mitt romney. we'll discuss how obama did and what's next for the gop and the governing challenges ahead? >>> but first, that friday afternoon bombshell. david petraeus resigns at the cia
of nancy pelosi. she did reclaim the house. is she staying on in washington customer. >> a lot coming up, but the weather forecast is cold. even colder than what we saw yesterday at this time. frost advisory. >> there are frost advisories posted as well. they were listed at 8:00, but it is chilly up there. temperatures range from 56 degrees to 63. it's on the chilly side for the bay area finance on time. a very nice sunday. we will have the entire forecast in a few minutes. >> thank you. california democrats in powerful positions they have been in decades after tuesday's election. >> is a super majority enabling them to pass tax increases without a single republican vote. republicans held the last super majority back in 1933. all this follows the campaign. that's a record levels of spending here in california. a few wealthy people spent tens of millions of dollars with mixed results. tom cyrus and $32 million in support of proposition 39 which did pass. charles munger spent $29 million on property to which failed. his sister spent $48 million in support of prop 38, which voters also reje
you so much from washington. so general petraeus was originally scheduled to testify before congress. libya, you heard athena reporting on that. lawmakers may still compel him to, at some point. instead, acting director michael mc morell will take over. general michael hayden has more on why. >> there is reasons that general petraeus will testify but frankly you want the agency to testify. you want someone who is knowledgeable about the event, what the agency knew, what the agency did, and mike morell is fully qualified to do that. now, at some later date they may want general petraeus to come back and give his personal perceptions. i understand that. but the hearing will go on and the c i'm a will tell what it knew about that event. >> michael morell is filling in as cia correct director. >>> an afghan girl testified today. staff sergeant robert bales is accused of killing 16 afghan villagers in march. the 7-year-old described via satellite how she hit behind her father as he was killed. today's hearing held at a washington military base will decide if there is enough evidence to br
was a lawyer and church member that the mormons had sent to washington as their delegate to congress. brigham young was, to put it mildly, not very happy with either babbitt or the federal appointees. he did not want nonmormons to interfere with the church's control of utah's politics. also he had heard all sorts of negative reports about babbitt's activities in washington. babbitt had drunk too much, he had cozied up to politicians hoping to get a territorial appointment for himself, all sorts of things. shortly after babbitt's return to utah, young summoned him to his office at 8:00 in the morning. young rarely started the day so early. he liked to go to bed late and get up late, and i think because of that he may have been in an especially cantankerous mood for the meeting. babbitt began by reporting that president fillmore hoped that you would not mingle your religion with your politics. the president worried that young would be as a prince of this world and a prophet for the next. babbitt and young then argued over a few things; federal appropriations for the territory. babbitt had bough
from this morning's "washington journal." don >> he is still resolute in the face of defeat. >> not to see you. sometimes you win. sometimes you lose. >> this is tough. he is a close contender. he has given credit for getting george bush elected in 2000. bbthe supreme court nominated george bush in 2000. since he has been in the white house has been brought about everything. he spent $300 million this year of other people's money. we do not know how much money he made for that deal. in nine senate races he got one win. he has spent maybe $170 million against barack obama and for mitt romney. he had a horrible record. on election night he tried to recreate florida 2000 on fox news by insisting that the network fox was wrong to in calling the election for president obama. the number crunchers said, no, you are wrong. he made a fool of himself. still today he insists he is right. i would hope that nobody would give that guy a dollar to spend in any future election. i think his career in politics should be over. not that i feel strongly about this, but he also has this enormous
took it to washington dc earlier in the summer, so we have been working with maryland and virginia and all over california and hopefully washington soon and really excited to get everybody interested with the information. >> somebody asked how do you implement a restorative justice program? do you have that answer. >> that's a good question and it's definitely county specific in california they noticed because i have done training in this program in different counties and i always invite the local da and the probation department and there are nuisances in every state and county and everyone wants to help. no one says no. they ask what they need to do to get on board and everybody is making it work and ways of it fitting in their system. >> there are a number of definitions of restorative justice i noticed and going to bullying prevention conversations in the country. some of them areis bad on native american tribal practices and i remember one teacher of restorative justice that did training in a lot of schools and talking about how there was a child who had offended another chi
september 16th, 1991, your young 29 year old, gay man living in washington, d.c., fulfilling your dream to be a lobbyist. and your physician calls. hi, sam. hi, herb. imagine i had hair, i had very curly hair. [laughter] >> and bill wilson has pictures of it and i know he's here. and he said, herb, i think you ought to come to my office. and i said, why? and he said, because, you know, you had some tests recently. i know, i had the flu, i came in, i did some tests. what's up? you need to come to my office. and these are the pills. and a week-and-a-half ago sunday, september 16th, 2012, as i sat in the synagogue during rosh hashanah services with my partner of 14 years, i reflected on the fact that that was 21 years ago. and even though i was active in the community, i turned to my friends in d.c., we didn't have the internet. remember that, anyone remember that? i see young people here. you don't know what that's like. think of a world with pink messages and no voice recorders. and i said, we have great resources here and i want to go and i want to talk to people, but where do you find
, an agreement in the politica posturing and theater that is famous in washington. each side trying to very carefully dance off the cliff without looking like it produced the disaster. there is, in the president' remarks today and boehner's yesterday, the inkling of an overture on each side, now, how much of one? with 52 days left to go, how real? rich edson in washington reading between the lines. what do you think, rich? >> well, neil, there's plenty of space. the's not that many details discussed. neither side says they want to box the other in the corner beginning negotiations. president obama, though, made it fairly clear he wants taxes to go up on wealthier taxpayers saying after the election, he was r-elected, democrats back the senate, and the message in the campaign is wealthier people need to pay more. therefore, that's the approach he's taken. as for what happens in the3 negotiations a next year, we're still very, very early in this, and so we continue to move forward. what we heard from house speaker boehner, he'll talk revenue. unprompted the other say said we'll discuss revenu
. >> gregg: new details emerging in a scandal rocking washington from c.i.a. headquarters to the white house even capitol hill. at the center of the storm, former c.i.a. director david petraeus and his biographer lawmakers are asking questions who knew what and when did they know it. >> reporter: f.b.i. never give anyone a head up. david petraeus was at the center of an investigation and the chairwoman of the senate intelligence committee says she plans an investigation of her own to find out why. senator dianne feinstein revealed that the affair came to light after the bureau was trying to figure out who was harassing another female friend of petraeus. >> there was somebody else he knew and he was close to. mrs. broadwell sent these threatening e-mails to her. she was frightened and she went to the f.b.i.. >> reporter: petraeus is no longer to testify in front of congress about benghazi but lindsay graham the truth will never come out if petraeus keeps quiet forever. >> we have a national security failure in the making. i don't see how in the world you can find out what happened in benghazi
running the house. that's what prevailed before americans voted, when deadlock reigned in washington, little got done, and the country was frustrated and angry. are we in for more of the same? the talk we are hearing in washington sounds altogether too familiar. so let's consider what's ahead with two people of different philosophies about what should be done. bob herbert was a long-time liberal columnist for "the new york times" until he retired last year and became a distinguished senior fellow for the national think tank demos. he's been on the road for months now, reporting for his forthcoming book, "wounded colossus." reihan salam writes "the agenda," that's a daily blog for the conservative national review online. he is a policy advisor at the think tank economics 21 and a columnist for reuters. he is also the co-author with ross douthat of the much talked-about book, "grand new party: how republicans can win the working class and save the american dream." welcome to both of you. >> great to see you, bill. >> bob, what will you remember about this election? >> well, the first t
means people don't have to go to washington, dc to pay their respects to the fallen. that project is expected to be complete in about 10 weeks. ♪ >>> in honor of veterans day, a special tribute this weekend for astronaut neil armstrong aboard the uss hornet. the retired aircraft carrier helped honor the space pioneer by reopening its exhibit of apollo program artifacts in alameda. >>> following the moon landing in 1969, a crew of apollo 11 was quarantined on board the hornet to ensure no one had contracted any alien viruses. >>> well, there's a new reality in sacramento. a democratic supermajority. >> we're going to take a look at the pros and cons of this big power shift. state senator mark leno joins us live in studio, next. >> and the best surfers in the world on standby right now, watching the window for the big mavericks contest. >> well, i hope they bring their wet suit. it's go doing be cold around the bay area today. plenty of sunshine, as we get off to a beautiful start on sunday morning. temperatures today manage only low 60s. we'll have the entire forecast, as we gaze
today. >>> washington looks at old arguments through a post-election prism. and the sudden end of a distinguished career. >> today. can they hear each other now? >> we can't just cut our way to prosperity. >> feeding the growth of government through higher tax rates won't help us solve the problem. >> avoiding the fiscal cliff. the downfall of the cia chief and the remains of superstorm sandy. with new jersey senator bob menendez and new york congressman peter king. then dissecting tuesday's results with california governor jerry brown. plus, cnn's dana bash looks at the grand old party and the new electorate with a foursome of republicans. former presidential candidate jon huntsman, congresswoman cathy mcmorris-rodgers. former commerce secretary carlos gutierrez, and conservative activist gary bauer piem candy crowley. and this is "state of the union." >>> good morning from california. the state that led the tax cut revolution in the late '70s but this past tuesday voted to raise taxes. we'll talk to governor jerry brown later in the show. but first, that fiscal cliff. those t
charges. bob orr, cbs news, washington. >>> this veterans' day weekend there's some additional hope for the former military members. cbs 5 either anne makovec shows us the pioneering program that's getting amputees to excel and even the most rigorous physical challenges. >> reporter: veteran david lad was injured in iraq in 2006. >> can we just not go there? >> reporter: he doesn't want to talk about how he lost his leg but will talk about how he's felt since. >> i didn't understand what it is i could do anymore. >> reporter: with more distance and time under his belt, this vietnam vet shares his story. >> chopper came in, it was nighttime. i laid down and blew me up. >> reporter: returning from war without his legs was another battle. >> of course back then it was what it was. and it was kind of difficult to integrate in. i stayed a hermit for about five years, lived on the backside of a mountain. >> reporter: these guys are part of ucsf's brand new program, the first in the country for civilian amputee athletes. >> you can have a very expensive prosthesis but if you don't have the
of the education trust in washington, dc and was the founding executive of education trust west in oakland. in these positions she advocated for public school students in california, focusing on achievement and opportunity gaps, improving can urriculum and instructional quality and ensuring quality education for everybody. she served as an advisor on education issues on a number of private ipbs institutions, she is a teacher, a lawyer, and a very influential voice on all policy matters. she was also passionate about ending this issue of bullying and bringing everyone together to stop this disturbing trend so please welcome assistant secretary for civil rights, ruslyn lee. as i said, our moderator is not always our lieutenant governor, of course he needs to introduction -- no, i get to say something. i get to say something. as everyone in this room knows, youngest mayor in 100 years, right? youngest mayor in 100 years when he was elected 10 years ago and he has remained an effective and visionary leader for everyone. mayor newsom gained worldwide recognition when he granted marriage l
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 74 (some duplicates have been removed)

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